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A cirrus cloud deck partially fills the sky looking southeast from Jenny Jump State Park in Hope Township (Warren County) around 10:30 AM on March 21. Inset in the upper right is a visible satellite image from the same time showing the cirrus pattern south of Jenny Jump (denoted by the red dot). Photo by Dave Robinson.

March 2020 was the 6th mildest in New Jersey dating back to 1895. Combined with mild rankings of 9th in January and 4th in February, 2020 has started off as the 2nd mildest on record at 5.8° above the 1981–2010 average. The 40.8° average only falls behind 2012’s 41.4°. Six of the ten mildest January–March intervals in the past 126 years have occurred since 2002.

March averaged 46.3° across NJ, which is 5.5° above average. The average maximum of 56.2° (+5.4°) ranked 7th mildest and the minimum of 36.4° (+5.6°) 2nd mildest. Anomalies were +5.8° in both the southern (47.9°) and coastal (47.7°) divisions, ranking 6th and 4th mildest, respectively, and +5.0° in the north (43.7°), ranking 9th mildest. As a result of the premature warmth, vegetation green up across the state was at least two weeks earlier than normal.

Latest Extremes

City, State Temp
Dennis Twp., NJ 53
Fortescue, NJ 53
Lower Alloways Creek, NJ 53
Woodbine, NJ 53
Cape May Court House, NJ 52
City, State Temp
Red Lion, NJ 42
High Point Monument, NJ 42
Howell, NJ 43
High Point, NJ 44
South Harrison, NJ 44
most current information as of Apr 9 6:14 AM

Latest Conditions & Forecast

New Brunswick, NJ

Rutgers University Meteorology Program

48°F

Wind

3 mph from the ENE

Wind Gust

5 mph from the ESE

Severe Thunderstorms and Breezy
63 °F
Partly Cloudy then Slight Chance Showers
37 °F
Breezy. Mostly Sunny then Slight Chance Showers
54 °F
Partly Cloudy and Breezy then Partly Cloudy
33 °F
Sunny
55 °F
Mostly Clear
36 °F
Partly Sunny
67 °F
Rain Likely then Rain
52 °F
Rain and Breezy
72 °F
Chance Rain then Partly Cloudy
46 °F
Partly Sunny
61 °F
Chance Rain
38 °F
Chance Rain
57 °F

Today

Showers and possibly a thunderstorm, mainly before 3pm, then a chance of showers and thunderstorms after 3pm. Some storms could be severe, with damaging winds. High near 63. Breezy, with a southeast wind 5 to 10 mph becoming west 15 to 20 mph in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 45 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

Tonight

A slight chance of showers between midnight and 1am. Partly cloudy, with a low around 37. West wind around 15 mph, with gusts as high as 40 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Friday

A slight chance of showers after 2pm. Partly sunny, with a high near 54. Breezy, with a west wind 20 to 25 mph, with gusts as high as 45 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Friday Night

Partly cloudy, with a low around 33. Breezy, with a west wind 15 to 20 mph, with gusts as high as 35 mph.

Saturday

Sunny, with a high near 55. West wind around 15 mph, with gusts as high as 30 mph.

Saturday Night

Mostly clear, with a low around 36.

Sunday

Partly sunny, with a high near 67.

Sunday Night

Rain, mainly after 8pm. Low around 52. Chance of precipitation is 90%.

Monday

Rain, mainly before 2pm. High near 72. Breezy. Chance of precipitation is 80%.

Monday Night

A chance of rain before 8pm. Partly cloudy, with a low around 46. Chance of precipitation is 30%.

Tuesday

Partly sunny, with a high near 61.

Tuesday Night

A chance of rain. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 38. Chance of precipitation is 30%.

Wednesday

A chance of rain. Partly sunny, with a high near 57. Chance of precipitation is 40%.

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Waterspout photo

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Increasingly Dry in the North: September 2014 Recap

October 6, 2014 - 3:04pm -- Dave Robinson

Dry grass

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Heat Events in New Brunswick: A Climatological Analysis

September 16, 2014 - 1:27pm -- Jack McCarty

Heat wave photo

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September 3, 2014 - 5:50pm -- Dave Robinson

Surf photo

A month ago, many NJ residents felt July was quite cool, while in fact it was just 0.4° below the 1981-2010 mean. Such was not the case in August, which truly was on the cool side. The statewide average temperature of 71.0° was 2.4° below average. It ranks as the 32nd coolest since 1895. Even when compared to the 1895-present mean, the month was 1.5° below average. Days with a maximum temperature of 90° or greater were hard to find, certainly a characteristic of the summer of 2014, which will be discussed later in this narrative.

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Doria flooding photo

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Mid-Atlantic Deluge

August 13, 2014 - 5:40pm -- Dave Robinson

Rainfall estimate map

Extremely heavy rain drenched portions of the Mid-Atlantic during the daytime hours on August 12 until after sunrise on the 13th. Starting off in the Washington-Baltimore area and moving up into central Long Island, a narrow ribbon of rainfall exceeding 5”, and over 10” in a few locales, resulted in flash flooding that resulted in water rescues and many damaged roads and vehicles. Excessively heavy rains, occasionally accompanied by lightning, traveled up a frontal boundary that was associated with an unusually strong August low-pressure system situated over the Great Lakes. The atmospheric impulses riding up this front joined forces with abundant atmospheric moisture (in the top 1% for the region) to bring multiple inches per hour rainfall rates…for multiple hours.

The heaviest rain was situated within less than a 10-mile wide path. Within 20 miles on either side, totals fell off to a mere inch or two, or even less. Such is the nature of these events, where despite the abundant atmospheric moisture, there is a finite amount of water available. The dynamics concentrated the atmospheric lifting, thus the condensation of the majority of the moisture and resultant rainfall, while adjacent areas balanced out the lifted air with subsiding air that greatly limited rainfall totals.

A Rather Average July, Believe It or Not: July 2014 Summary

August 4, 2014 - 6:26pm -- Dave Robinson

Thunderstorm photo

Despite a general feeling amongst NJ residents that July 2014 was a cold summer month, in actuality, compared to long-term records, it was rather average. The statewide average temperature of 74.5° was 0.5° below the 1981-2010 mean. However, it was 0.3° above the 1895-present mean and ranked as the 45th warmest July of the past 119 years. Even the number of afternoons with temperatures of 90° or higher was close to normal. So why the common misperception? Some armchair psychology brings me to four possibilities:

1) The first half of the month was above average, while the more recent weeks were on the cool side. Our perceptions are biased toward the most recent.

2) People have yet to “recover" from the cold start of 2014. The dubious media ramblings of the “polar vortex" returning to the eastern US in mid-July fueled these thoughts.

3) The most recent four NJ Julys all rank in the top six for warmth over the past 119 years. This was an amazing run of hot Julys.

4) Those sticking their toes in the Jersey surf in early July were shocked by water temperatures in the 50°s and may have equated this to the cool July atmosphere. The cold surf was actually indicative of persistent southerly winds that brought atmospheric warmth. This wind flow led to coastal upwelling that pushed warmer surface waters offshore and introduced cool deeper waters to the surf zone.

So this is how a normal July feels...

July 27, 2014 - 8:45pm -- Dave Robinson

Beach sunset photo

Another comfortable mid-summer air mass is destined to invade the Garden State this week. This arrives on the heels of several other mild, dry air masses that have contributed to making this a rather average July in the temperature department. While many may think that this has been an exceptionally cool summer, it has not. However, given that the most recent four Julys all ranked within the top six for heat dating all the way back to 1895, all are forgiven for any misperception!

The overall pattern that has led to temperatures more often being on the cool than than warm side of the ledger since last fall is one of pronounced waviness in the jet stream, with a resultant tendency for a ridge (northward swing) in western North America and a trough (dip in the jet) in the east. This allows cool and dry air to infiltrate our region, with warm and humid air kept at bay to the south. It has also kept the west in severe drought and plenty warm.

Soaking rains keep much of the Garden State green

July 17, 2014 - 10:59pm -- Dave Robinson

Heavy rain photo

The past week has seen localized soaking rains across much of NJ, though not everywhere has gotten clobbered. The map below shows rainfall totals from Sunday morning the 13th through the morning of the 16th. Over this roughly 72 hour interval as much as 8.52” fell in Howell Township (Monmouth County), followed by Belmar (Monmouth) with 7.42”, Wall Township (Ocean) 7.22”, Millstone Township (Monmouth) 5.98”, and Raritan (Somerset) 5.42”. To demonstrate the local variability of the precipitation, four Bridgewater (Somerset) locations received 5.09”, 4.55”, 4.41” and 3.88”. Differences were even more pronounced over distances of several tens of miles. For instance, only 20 miles from Howell, rainfall totaled just 0.89” at Seaside Heights (Ocean) to the south and 2.42” in Rumson (Monmouth) to the north.

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